Julien Bitoun: “I put everything in Little Ones”

Before his appearance at the Beauregard festival on July 8, let’s go back to the Why Me? Why Not by Liam Gallagher. Interview

Recorded between Los Angeles and London (notably at Abbey Road for the strings), Why Me? why not is in the same vein as its predecessor As You Were : pure British rock varying tempos and moods and without any desire to stick to the times. So much the better, Liam Gallagher does not betray himself and proves to be true to himself. Just like during this interview. The day before, he canceled all his promotion in Paris (we suspect he wanted to take advantage of the charms of the capital) to finally agree to stay the next day to ensure the interviews. Which he will do with good grace. After all, he has news to spare: the album, of course, but also the documentaries Supersonicon the epic Oasisrecently broadcast on Arte, and As It Was, dedicated solely to, Liam, released before the summer in a few British cinemas. Obviously, the language of wood is prohibited. “Fookin’” with each line, lines of perfectly cynical humor but also emotion. With age, would Liam become sentimental?

First of all, why this title, Why Me? why not ?

Liam Gallagher: It is positive, short and direct. As You Were was too. And John Lennon album titles. And on a T-shirt, it slaps. But it makes sense. Not like that kind of band called 1975. Seriously, guys? Why Me? why notit is a title as obvious, as fluid as the recording of this album. With Greg and Andrew, we have a lot of potential. We know that it’s life that should be inspired, not cosmic bullshit or inner trips that nobody cares about.

In the eponymous title, you sing: “I’m a Jedi”. For real ?

Liam Gallagher: Yes, I am a fighter. In my life, there have been bad times, I made rookie mistakes, then just mistakes, disappointments and anger. But I never said to myself: I’m going to jump out that fucking window. So today I am here. And, contrary to what people think, I’m a 99% happy man. I love music, my girlfriend, my children, my mother, I love life.

“I don’t consider myself a songwriter. I am not Paul Weller! »

This can be seen in As It Was – was it important for you to make this documentary?

Liam Gallagher: It was not my idea, but that of Charlie Lightening and Gavin Fitzgerald, the directors. Besides, I had seen Supersonic and I doubted the interest in adding a layer. OK, I often open it on lots of subjects, but why does my life deserve an entire documentary? Don’t people know enough about me? And then I was convinced that the success ofAs You Were was interesting to tell. There’s my family, my loved ones… It’s nice, but I don’t get up in the morning congratulating myself on being the subject of a film.

However, it shows the audience a more vulnerable, less vindictive side of you. We could even go so far as to speak of, ummaturity ?

Liam Gallagher: Ha ha. The worst thing is that it is true. There comes a time when you have to be a bit adult. Just a little bit ! The success of As You Were did me a lot of good. 100,000 copies sold the first week, I did not expect it. After the average reception of beady-eye, I was not sure of my move. And then the music industry had changed so much since my beginnings! But I took a break, got away from it all for a few months and came back feeling refreshed.

In the song “Be Still”, you talk about your mother: “My mama said / Keep moving on / Though you’re down you’re gonna rise again”. Is that what she’s actually telling you?

Liam Gallagher: Yeah. My mother has been my number one fan since I was born. She always supported me, encouraged me despite my bullshit. His gaze on me didn’t prevent me from drinking too much, from smoking too much, from doing anything, but he brought me the love that I needed.

Speaking of love, you also sing your love for your fiancée, Debbie Gwyther…

LG: Thanks to her, life has become a good place to live. Debbie is beautiful and very strong. She listens to me a lot, but I listen to her even more. She knows the bullshit that I must not do.

“On stage, I have good days and bad days…”

Isn’t the song “Now I’ve Found You” addressed to her, where you ask the person you love not to leave you?

LG: To my daughter Molly (21 years old, that he had with Lisa Moorish, editor’s note). I had never met her before last year, and now we see each other all the time. I don’t want to lose this relationship which is very precious.

As much as the music you write and sing?

LG: Exactly. I’m always super excited when I release an album, when I start a tour. Sing my favorite songs. If there is one that I really like on Why Me? why not, it’s “Once”. A fucking ballad, right? Music is my oxygen, and I enjoyed being in Oasis as much as being solo. But beware: I don’t consider myself a songwriter. I am not Paul Weller! I write a little with Greg and Andrew, but above all I remain a singer. In As It Was, you can see me playing a few chords on the guitar and imagining two sentences on it… but that’s as far as it goes. If I hadn’t written a single line on my album, it wouldn’t make me hot or cold. My real talent lies in expression. The performance. The voice.

Who does not move one iota!

LG: I’m rather proud of it, I admit. However, I drink, I still smoke a little. Not in the studio, anyway. This is where I’m the best. On stage, I have good and bad days…

The last time we saw each other, you talked about your last nightmare: playing in Christmas’ High Flyin’ Birds. Does that kind of bad dream still happen to you?

LG: Fortunately not !

Even singing a title like “One of Us”, and knowing that it’s been ten years since Oasis broke up…?

LG: Yeah. It was Noel’s decision, a real shitty decision. “One of Us” isn’t just about him, it’s also about friends from the past… Yeah, I admit, it’s a moving song. There’s love in it, that’s for sure. But I’m not desperate, I’m not getting on my fucking knees to beg him. He was the one who was stupid enough to blow up the best band in the world. Not me.

In your opinion, why Oasis remains so mythical, ten years after its disappearance?

LG: The music was good, the musicians too, we could count on each other. And then there was our attitude, the way we talked, that we didn’t give a fuck about anything. Our look was also super important! Clarks, parkas, wide jeans…

Interview to be found in its entirety in our number 118, available at the end of the month.

Interview by Sophie Rosemont

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Julien Bitoun: “I put everything in Little Ones”


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