Emma Chamberlain opens the doors of her dream home for us

When Emma Chamberlin was old enough to vote, he was already a bona fide social media phenomenon. Venerable old-school magazines — the same ones that faced an existential crisis over the rise of new media — went out of their way to heap praise on the teen internet superstar. The New York Times described her as “the funniest person on YouTube”, someone who “changed the world of video on-line“. Atlantic He called it “the influencer most talked about teenager in the world.” The magazine Time included her in its 2019 list of the 25 most influential people on the internet, alongside the likes of rapper Lil Nas X, congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

Now, at the ripe old age of 21, Chamberlain is enjoying the second act of his glittering career: focusing on his podcast. Anything Goes, which has a large audience; building his signature Chamberlain Coffee business; promoting its brand associations with Louis Vuitton, Cartier and Levi’s, as well as a host of other companies harnessing the power of its extraordinary popularity. If anyone is curious to know what is the secret of the success of Emma Chamberlain, the answer lies in the fiery comment threads that accompany his posts on the internet and in the press, in which certain words appear again and again: fun, authentic, candid, close, real.

Chamberlain kept the original sink and mirror in a dressing table. The braided bacbac (banana bark) wallcovering is from Schumacher.

Christopher Stuman.

Clad in tile by CorkHouse, a guest bathroom has a chandelier by Lindsey Adelman, a Material Lust chair by JF Chen, and an onyx sink with fixtures by Watermark Designs.

Christopher Stuman.

Those same qualities emerge in three-dimensional form in Emma Chamberlain’s new house in Los Angeles. Designed in collaboration with Ashley Drost and Marie Trohman of Proem Studio, the house deftly reflects the laid-back vibe and intriguing sensibility of its inhabitant, who privileges the unexpected and idiosyncratic over predictable design trophies and tired meanings of luxury. “I work from home, so I wanted to create something completely personal and comfortable,” says Chamberlain. “I’ve brought references from many decades and eras of design, and I’ve tried to meld them into something that feels not only cohesive, but also new. It wasn’t about following the rules or sticking to one aesthetic. I tried to approach everything with nonchalance and open minded”.

Emma Chamberlain, wearing a Dior jacket and skirt, Cartier jewelry and Jeffrey Campbell shoes, in the garden. Fashion styling by Jared Ellner.

Christopher Stuman.

The existing house provided a lot of inspiration. Built in 1955 and clad in cedar shingles, the structure looks like an odd hybrid of modernity hippy Northern California and Topanga Canyon bohemian, with a dash of Adirondack charm (imagine cozy fireplaces crackling under beamed ceilings). “It almost felt like summer camp, so we leaned into that environment. We described it as a mix between Wet Hot American Summer Y Troop Beverly Hills. Emma said, ‘I love that idea, but I have no idea what you’re talking about,'” recalls Drost, laughing at the difference in generational references: “Honestly, it’s not a perfect house, and it never will be. But it has a lot of character and energy, and the imperfections just add to the narrative that we develop with Emma,” says Trohman.

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Emma Chamberlain opens the doors of her dream home for us


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