Adèle Haenel, actress in Portrait of a Woman on Fire, retires from cinema: “The industry is racist and patriarchal” | tomatoes

The film industry is not exempt from problems, complex and well-rooted problems that are difficult to cut all at once. Adèle Haenel, actress of French nationality who stands out for her work in Portrait of a Woman on Fire- 88%, announces for FAQ that she is withdrawing forever from the seventh art due to the racism and patriarchy that prevail in its recesses, discouraging her from continuing to work in a world where there does not seem to be even a distant solution to these evils.

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In addition to her role as Héloïse in Portrait of the young girl in feureleased in 2019 and directed by Céline Sciamma, Adele is known for films like Deerskin, 120 Beats per Minute – Adele Haenel actress in Portrait of a Woman on Fire96%, Faces of a Woman – 43%, The Unknown Girl – 66%, Water Lilies – Adele Haenel actress in Portrait of a Woman on Fire77%, Die Blumen von Gestern, A peuple et son roi Y L’Homme qu’on aimit trop. At 33 years old, she has received awards such as the César for Best Leading and Supporting Actress, as well as the Romy Schneider award. In 2014 she came out as a lesbian and her activism for women’s rights has increased slowly and effectively.

During his recent interview with FAQ, Adele revealed to the astonished interlocutor that for political reasons he has made the decision to leave the film industry, focusing on the theater:

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I will no longer make movies. Because the film industry is absolutely reactionary, racist and patriarchal. We are fooling ourselves when we tell ourselves that those in power have good will, that the world really will go in the right direction under their good and sometimes clumsy stewardship. Of course, no. The only thing that structurally moves society is social struggle. And it seems to me that in my case going out means fighting. Leaving this industry forever, I want to be part of another world, another cinema.

For Haenel, this problem stems from the assertion that social order comes from nature and that it will always be so: “To say that things have always existed is a misrepresentation used to obscure the active and consciously determined selection process that maintains power relations .” The interpreter condemns white men for their stay in power, and for their continuous validation of each other to maintain the status quo and power relations.

My political beliefs are the most important thing to me right now. Of course, I worked in the film industry and tried to change something. For example, the perspective of women in movies. I tried to change something from within. When it comes to the MeToo movement, women’s issues, or racism, the film industry is extremely problematic. I don’t want to be a part of that anymore.

Portrait of a Woman on Fire presents the story of an artist who must paint the wedding portrait of a young bride, all on an island in Brittany at the end of the 18th century. But what begins as a mere professional relationship begins to evolve into something more intimate and, at the time, forbidden.

Racism and patriarchy is something that is also widely detected in the Hollywood industry. Movements like Time’s Up or Me Too seek to expose the criminals in the industry who use their power to intimidate and harm countless women and other minorities. Although the years have passed and the studies have presumably made an effort to be diverse and inclusive, the problems are still there, latent.

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Adèle Haenel, actress in Portrait of a Woman on Fire, retires from cinema: “The industry is racist and patriarchal” | tomatoes


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